Archive for April 2008

Simplifying semantics with type class morphisms

When I first started playing with functional reactivity in Fran and its predecessors, I didn’t realize that much of the functionality of events and reactive behaviors could be packaged via standard type classes. Then Conor McBride & Ross Paterson introduced us to applicative functors, and I remembered using that pattern to reduce all of the lifting operators in Fran to just two, which correspond to pure and (< *>) in the Applicative class. So, in working on a new library for functional reactive programming (FRP), I thought I’d modernize the interface to use standard type classes as much as possible.

While spelling out a precise (denotational) semantics for the FRP instances of these classes, I noticed a lovely recurring pattern:

The meaning of each method corresponds to the same method for the meaning.

In this post, I’ll give some examples of this principle and muse a bit over its usefulness. For more details, see the paper Simply efficient functional reactivity. Another post will start exploring type class morphisms and type composition, and ask questions I’m wondering about.

Continue reading ‘Simplifying semantics with type class morphisms’ »

Simply efficient functional reactivity

I submitted a paper Simply efficient functional reactivity to ICFP 2008.


Functional reactive programming (FRP) has simple and powerful semantics, but has resisted efficient implementation. In particular, most past implementations have used demand-driven sampling, which accommodates FRP’s continuous time semantics and fits well with the nature of functional programming. Consequently, values are wastefully recomputed even when inputs don’t change, and reaction latency can be as high as the sampling period.

This paper presents a way to implement FRP that combines data- and demand-driven evaluation, in which values are recomputed only when necessary, and reactions are nearly instantaneous. The implementation is rooted in a new simple formulation of FRP and its semantics and so is easy to understand and reason about.

On the road to efficiency and simplicity, we’ll meet some old friends (monoids, functors, applicative functors, monads, morphisms, and improving values) and make some new friends (functional future values, reactive normal form, and concurrent “unambiguous choice”).