Thoughts on semantics for 3D graphics

The central question for me in designing software is always

What does it mean?

With functional programming, this question is especially crisp. For each data type I define, I want to have a precise and simple mathematical model. (For instance, my model for behavior is function-of-time, and my model of images is function-of-2D-space.) Every operation on the type is also given a meaning in terms of that semantic model.

This specification process, which is denotational semantics applied to data types, provides a basis for

  • correctness of the implementation,
  • user documentation free of implementation detail,
  • generating and proving properties, which can then be used in automated testing, and
  • evaluating and comparing the elegance and expressive power of design decisions.

For an example (2D images), some motivation of this process, and discussion, see Luke Palmer’s post Semantic Design. See also my posts on the idea and use of type class morphisms, which provide additional structure to denotational design.

In spring of 2008, I started working on a functional 3D library, FieldTrip. I’ve designed functional 3D libraries before as part of TBAG, ActiveVRML, and Fran. This time I wanted a semantics-based design, for all of the reasons given above. As always, I want a model that is

  • simple,
  • elegant, and
  • general.

For 3D, I also want the model to be GPU-friendly, i.e., to execute well on (modern) GPUs and to give access to their abilities.

I hadn’t thought of or heard a model that I was happy with, and so I didn’t have the sort of firm ground I like to stand on in working on FieldTrip. Last February, such a model occurred to me. I’ve had this blog post mostly written since then. Recently, I’ve been focused on functional 3D again for GPU-based rendering, and then Sean McDirmid posed a similar question, which got me thinking again.

Continue reading ‘Thoughts on semantics for 3D graphics’ »

3D rendering as functional reactive programming